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Leading Manufacturer, Supplier & Retailer of Amla and Garlic.

Amla

The company brings in the finest quality of amla fruit. Sourced from the river beds of Cauvery and river Vasista, they are reckoned as one of the most nutrition rich herbal fruits. Amla is remarkable for versatile use in various domestic as well as industrial applications. Our medicinal amla is used as raw materials for diverse kinds of herbal and ayurvedic medicines. It is rich in organic contents and thus is absolutely safe to consume in any form without any side effects. When it comes to the wholesale amla sellers in the market, we are the name to reckon with. Moreover, we are one of the principal amla powder manufacturers and suppliers in India. The Indian gooseberry (Phyllanthus emblica, syn. Emblica officinalis) is a deciduous tree of the Euphorbiaceae family. It is known for its edible fruit of the same name. Common names of this tree include amalaka in Sanskrit, amla (आँवला) in Hindi, Nellikai in Tamil , amlaki in Bengali, and amala in Nepal Bhasa. Plant Anatomy The tree is small to medium sized, reaching 8 to 18 m in height, with crooked trunk and spreading branches. The branchlets are glabrous or finely pubescent, 10-20 cm long, usually deciduous; the leaves simple, subsessile and closely set along branchlets, light green, resembling pinnate leaves.The flowers are greenish-yellow. The fruit is nearly spherical, light greenish yellow, quite smooth and hard on appearance, with 6 vertical stripes or furrows. Ripening in autumn, the berries are harvested by hand after climbing to upper branches bearing the fruits.The taste of Indian gooseberry is sour, bitter and astringent, and is quite fibrous. In India, it is common to eat gooseberries, steeped in salt water and turmeric, to make the sour fruits palatable. Medical Research Indian gooseberry has undergone preliminary research, demonstrating in vitro antiviral and antimicrobial properties.Experimental preparations of leaves, bark or fruit have shown potential efficacy against laboratory models of disease, such as for inflammation, cancer, age-related renal disease, and diabetes. A human pilot study demonstrated reduction of blood cholesterol levels in both normal and hypercholesterolemic men. Although fruits are reputed to contain high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), 445 mg100g, the specific contents are disputed and the overall antioxidant strength of amla may derive instead from its high density of tannins and other polyphenols.The fruit also contains flavonoids, kaempferol, ellagic acid and gallic acid. Traditional Uses In folk medicine, dried and fresh fruits of the plant are used. All parts of the plant are used in various Ayurvedic herbal preparations, including the fruit, seed, leaves, root, bark and flowers.According to Ayurveda, amla fruit is sour (amla) and astringent (kashaya) in taste (rasa), with sweet (madhura), bitter (tikta) and pungent (katu) secondary tastes (anurasas).Its qualities (gunas) are light (laghu) and dry (ruksha), the post-digestive effect (vipaka) is sweet (madhura), and its energy (virya) is cooling (shita). According to Ayurveda, amla is specific to pitta due to its sweet taste and cooling energy.However, amla is thought to balance vata by virtue of its sour taste, and kapha due to its astringent taste and drying action. It may be used as a rasayana (rejuvenative]] to promote longevity, and traditionally to enhance digestion (dipanapachana), treat constipation (anuloma), reduce fever (jvaraghna), purify the blood (raktaprasadana), reduce cough (kasahara), alleviate asthma (svasahara), strengthen the heart (hrdaya), benefit the eyes (chakshushya), stimulate hair growth (romasanjana), enliven the body (jivaniya), and enhance intellect (medhya). In Ayurvedic polyherbal formulations, Indian gooseberry is a common constituent, and most notably is the primary ingredient in an ancient herbal rasayana called Chyawanprash.This formula, which contains 43 herbal ingredients as well as clarified butter, sesame oil, sugar cane juice, and honey, was first mentioned in the Charaka Samhita as a premier rasayana or rejuvenative compound. Popularly used in inks, shampoos and hair oils, the high tannin content of Indian gooseberry fruit serves as a mordant for fixing dyes in fabrics. Amla shampoos and hair oil are traditionally believed to nourish the hair and scalp and prevent premature grey hair.[citation needed] In Hinduism, amla is regarded as a sacred tree worshipped as Mother Earth.

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Garlic

garlic is a strong aromatic crop that is being cultivated in india, since ancient times. It is renowned for its distinctive flavor as well as medicinal properties. The garlic seeds made available by us are extensively used for curing coughs and fevers. Green garlic leaves are also applied externally to prevent the graying of hairs as well as to cure skin ailments such as eczema and scabies. And, when it comes to the leading wholesale garlic suppliers in the market, our services are the best. Moreover, we are also one of the principal garlic oil manufacturers from india. garlic is a strongly aromatic bulb crop that has been cultivated for thousands of years. Today it is renowned throughout the world for its distinctive flavour as well as health giving properties. South asia is no exception in using garlic in both cooking and medicine. the plant garlic is an upright plant that grows up to about 60 cm tall. The long, sword-shaped leaves grow from the bulb beneath the surface of the soil. Bulbs - rounded, composed of several smaller bulbs called cloves. Cloves and bulbs are covered by a white papery coat and are used in both cookery and medicine. only known as a domesticated crop in cultivation, garlic is thought to have originated in central asia. Garlic - history originating from central asia, the garlic we know today is a domesticated crop. The plant has spread since ancient times to other parts of the world as a food, flavouring and medicine. It is mentioned in ancient egyptian, greek, indian and chinese writings. garlic remedies the bulbs are the most frequently used parts of the plant. In india they are prepared in several ways including extracting the juice or pulping the bulb to a paste. This has been taken to relieve problems such as coughs and fevers, or applied externally to prevent the greying of hairs and to improve skin conditions such as eczema and scabies. It has even been applied to the noses of hysterical girls to calm them down! warmed garlic juice, or a mixture made with oil and the boiled bulb has been dropped into the ear to relieve earache and deafness. In ayurvedic and siddha medicine garlic juice has been used to alleviate sinus problems. In unani medicine, an extract is prepared from the dried bulb which is inhaled to promote abortion or taken to regulate menstruation. Unani physicians also use garlic to treat paralysis, forgetfulness, tremor, colic pains, internal ulcers and fevers. folk medicine extracts of the bulbs have been widely used in folk medicine. Whooping cough in children has been treated by administering a drink made with a hot water extract of the dried bulb mixed with honey, or by wearing a necklace of bulbs. Hot water extracts are also taken to kill intestinal worms. In pakistan an extract is traditionally taken orally to settle the stomach, treat coughs reduce fever. garlic bulbs have sometimes been combined with other plants to make medicines. Mixed with the leaves of the ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) it is used as a treatment for rabies. An infusion of the entire plant has been combined with sugar and taken to treat fevers. Garlic has also been used in traditional indian veterinary medicine to treat tetanus and inflammatory disorders of the lungs. garlic around the world garlic also features in traditional medicine in other parts of the world. In nepal, east asia and the middle east it has been used to treat all manner of illnesses including fevers, diabetes, rheumatism, intestinal worms, colic, flatulence, dysentery, liver disorders, tuberculosis, facial paralysis, high blood pressure and bronchitis. Garlic - western medicine the medicinal properties of garlic are now scientifically recognised. It is widely available in different forms in britain as over-the-counter supplements, particularly to treat the blood conditions and as an antiviral medicine. active compounds various sulphur-containing compounds occur in garlic. One such compound is called alliin. Crushing or chopping garlic may also promote enzyme reactions and allow other compounds to form. Studies show that these compounds may be responsible for various effects including pain relief, antiworm, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant, anticancer, blood glucose lowering, blood pressure lowering and liver protection. other research shows that garlic may help lower cholesterol, prevent blood clots and spasms, act as an expectorant and alleviate swellings, sores and acne. safety garlic is generally a very safe plant. Occasional reports show that adverse effects have occurred in humans. These include a burning sensation in the mouth and intestine, sickness, and odour from the breath and the body. It may also cause a reaction in the skin of some people, possibly due to the sulphur-containing compounds. Because of this, garlic should not be placed directly on the skin. Garlic may interfere with some prescribed medicines. For example, those used for preventing blood clots could be enhanced by garlic. There may also be an increased risk of bleeding with the use of garlic in patients undergoing surgery. few experimental or clinical studies have been conducted to assess the use of garlic in pregnant or breastfeeding women. In traditional medicine it has been reputed to promote abortion and contractions of the uterus. Consumption of garlic by breastfeeding women may alter the taste and smell of breast milk and so alter the feeding behaviour of babies. garlic - food garlic has been used as a food for thousands of years. It was traditionally used to add flavour to food. It is sold fresh, as a dry powder and as an oil and. Garlic is very popular in south asian cuisine. flavouring garlic is one of the most frequently used plants in many parts of india, pakistan and bangladesh and there are many different ways of using garlic. It is used not only to flavour curries but can be used for drinks and savoury deserts. To add a mild flavour to food the fresh cloves are cooked whole. If a stronger flavour is required, garlic cloves are crushed or ground and added to the dish. Garlic should not be cooked for too long as it can become bitter. Often garlic heads with small cloves are stronger than larger ones. an oil is processed from garlic which is used commercially as a flavouring. It it can be added to flavour otherwise bland vegetable oils. there are many different varieties of garlic on the market. The diversity in size and flavour is apparent in south asian markets. Garlic is not popular among everyone. Certain sects in india, such as jains and hindu brahmins, are forbidden to eat onion-related plants like garlic. The reasons differ in each case. Jains consider use of garlic to be too damaging to the plant, while some hindus consider garlic too stimulating. garlic - other uses garlic is sometime grown as a pest repelling plant by gardeners. Some companies have taken its pest-repelling properties a step further by isolating active compounds and marketing them in a spray-on formula.

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Garlic

garlic is a strong aromatic crop that is being cultivated in india, since ancient times. It is renowned for its distinctive flavor as well as medicinal properties. The garlic seeds made available by us are extensively used for curing coughs and fevers. Green garlic leaves are also applied externally to prevent the graying of hairs as well as to cure skin ailments such as eczema and scabies. And, when it comes to the leading wholesale garlic suppliers in the market, our services are the best. Moreover, we are also one of the principal garlic oil manufacturers from india. garlic is a strongly aromatic bulb crop that has been cultivated for thousands of years. Today it is renowned throughout the world for its distinctive flavour as well as health giving properties. South asia is no exception in using garlic in both cooking and medicine. the plant garlic is an upright plant that grows up to about 60 cm tall. The long, sword-shaped leaves grow from the bulb beneath the surface of the soil. bulbs - rounded, composed of several smaller bulbs called cloves. Cloves and bulbs are covered by a white papery coat and are used in both cookery and medicine. only known as a domesticated crop in cultivation, garlic is thought to have originated in central asia. garlic - history originating from central asia, the garlic we know today is a domesticated crop. The plant has spread since ancient times to other parts of the world as a food, flavouring and medicine. It is mentioned in ancient egyptian, greek, indian and chinese writings. garlic remedies the bulbs are the most frequently used parts of the plant. In india they are prepared in several ways including extracting the juice or pulping the bulb to a paste. This has been taken to relieve problems such as coughs and fevers, or applied externally to prevent the greying of hairs and to improve skin conditions such as eczema and scabies. It has even been applied to the noses of hysterical girls to calm them down! warmed garlic juice, or a mixture made with oil and the boiled bulb has been dropped into the ear to relieve earache and deafness. In ayurvedic and siddha medicine garlic juice has been used to alleviate sinus problems. In unani medicine, an extract is prepared from the dried bulb which is inhaled to promote abortion or taken to regulate menstruation. Unani physicians also use garlic to treat paralysis, forgetfulness, tremor, colic pains, internal ulcers and fevers. folk medicine extracts of the bulbs have been widely used in folk medicine. Whooping cough in children has been treated by administering a drink made with a hot water extract of the dried bulb mixed with honey, or by wearing a necklace of bulbs. Hot water extracts are also taken to kill intestinal worms. In pakistan an extract is traditionally taken orally to settle the stomach, treat coughs reduce fever. garlic bulbs have sometimes been combined with other plants to make medicines. Mixed with the leaves of the ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) it is used as a treatment for rabies. An infusion of the entire plant has been combined with sugar and taken to treat fevers. Garlic has also been used in traditional indian veterinary medicine to treat tetanus and inflammatory disorders of the lungs. garlic around the world garlic also features in traditional medicine in other parts of the world. In nepal, east asia and the middle east it has been used to treat all manner of illnesses including fevers, diabetes, rheumatism, intestinal worms, colic, flatulence, dysentery, liver disorders, tuberculosis, facial paralysis, high blood pressure and bronchitis. garlic - western medicine the medicinal properties of garlic are now scientifically recognised. It is widely available in different forms in britain as over-the-counter supplements, particularly to treat the blood conditions and as an antiviral medicine. active compounds various sulphur-containing compounds occur in garlic. One such compound is called alliin. Crushing or chopping garlic may also promote enzyme reactions and allow other compounds to form. Studies show that these compounds may be responsible for various effects including pain relief, antiworm, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant, anticancer, blood glucose lowering, blood pressure lowering and liver protection. other research shows that garlic may help lower cholesterol, prevent blood clots and spasms, act as an expectorant and alleviate swellings, sores and acne. safety garlic is generally a very safe plant. Occasional reports show that adverse effects have occurred in humans. These include a burning sensation in the mouth and intestine, sickness, and odour from the breath and the body. It may also cause a reaction in the skin of some people, possibly due to the sulphur-containing compounds. Because of this, garlic should not be placed directly on the skin. Garlic may interfere with some prescribed medicines. For example, those used for preventing blood clots could be enhanced by garlic. There may also be an increased risk of bleeding with the use of garlic in patients undergoing surgery. few experimental or clinical studies have been conducted to assess the use of garlic in pregnant or breastfeeding women. In traditional medicine it has been reputed to promote abortion and contractions of the uterus. Consumption of garlic by breastfeeding women may alter the taste and smell of breast milk and so alter the feeding behaviour of babies. garlic - food garlic has been used as a food for thousands of years. It was traditionally used to add flavour to food. It is sold fresh, as a dry powder and as an oil and. Garlic is very popular in south asian cuisine. flavouring garlic is one of the most frequently used plants in many parts of india, pakistan and bangladesh and there are many different ways of using garlic. It is used not only to flavour curries but can be used for drinks and savoury deserts. To add a mild flavour to food the fresh cloves are cooked whole. If a stronger flavour is required, garlic cloves are crushed or ground and added to the dish. Garlic should not be cooked for too long as it can become bitter. Often garlic heads with small cloves are stronger than larger ones. an oil is processed from garlic which is used commercially as a flavouring. It it can be added to flavour otherwise bland vegetable oils. there are many different varieties of garlic on the market. The diversity in size and flavour is apparent in south asian markets. garlic is not popular among everyone. Certain sects in india, such as jains and hindu brahmins, are forbidden to eat onion-related plants like garlic. The reasons differ in each case. Jains consider use of garlic to be too damaging to the plant, while some hindus consider garlic too stimulating. garlic - other uses garlic is sometime grown as a pest repelling plant by gardeners. Some companies have taken its pest-repelling properties a step further by isolating active compounds and marketing them in a spray-on formula.

View Complete Details

Garlic

garlic is a strong aromatic crop that is being cultivated in india, since ancient times. It is renowned for its distinctive flavor as well as medicinal properties. The garlic seeds made available by us are extensively used for curing coughs and fevers. Green garlic leaves are also applied externally to prevent the graying of hairs as well as to cure skin ailments such as eczema and scabies. And, when it comes to the leading wholesale garlic suppliers in the market, our services are the best. Moreover, we are also one of the principal garlic oil manufacturers from india. garlic is a strongly aromatic bulb crop that has been cultivated for thousands of years. Today it is renowned throughout the world for its distinctive flavour as well as health giving properties. South asia is no exception in using garlic in both cooking and medicine. the plant garlic is an upright plant that grows up to about 60 cm tall. The long, sword-shaped leaves grow from the bulb beneath the surface of the soil. Bulbs - rounded, composed of several smaller bulbs called cloves. Cloves and bulbs are covered by a white papery coat and are used in both cookery and medicine. only known as a domesticated crop in cultivation, garlic is thought to have originated in central asia. Garlic - history originating from central asia, the garlic we know today is a domesticated crop. The plant has spread since ancient times to other parts of the world as a food, flavouring and medicine. It is mentioned in ancient egyptian, greek, indian and chinese writings. garlic remedies the bulbs are the most frequently used parts of the plant. In india they are prepared in several ways including extracting the juice or pulping the bulb to a paste. This has been taken to relieve problems such as coughs and fevers, or applied externally to prevent the greying of hairs and to improve skin conditions such as eczema and scabies. It has even been applied to the noses of hysterical girls to calm them down! warmed garlic juice, or a mixture made with oil and the boiled bulb has been dropped into the ear to relieve earache and deafness. In ayurvedic and siddha medicine garlic juice has been used to alleviate sinus problems. In unani medicine, an extract is prepared from the dried bulb which is inhaled to promote abortion or taken to regulate menstruation. Unani physicians also use garlic to treat paralysis, forgetfulness, tremor, colic pains, internal ulcers and fevers. folk medicine extracts of the bulbs have been widely used in folk medicine. Whooping cough in children has been treated by administering a drink made with a hot water extract of the dried bulb mixed with honey, or by wearing a necklace of bulbs. Hot water extracts are also taken to kill intestinal worms. In pakistan an extract is traditionally taken orally to settle the stomach, treat coughs reduce fever. garlic bulbs have sometimes been combined with other plants to make medicines. Mixed with the leaves of the ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) it is used as a treatment for rabies. An infusion of the entire plant has been combined with sugar and taken to treat fevers. Garlic has also been used in traditional indian veterinary medicine to treat tetanus and inflammatory disorders of the lungs. garlic around the world garlic also features in traditional medicine in other parts of the world. In nepal, east asia and the middle east it has been used to treat all manner of illnesses including fevers, diabetes, rheumatism, intestinal worms, colic, flatulence, dysentery, liver disorders, tuberculosis, facial paralysis, high blood pressure and bronchitis. Garlic - western medicine the medicinal properties of garlic are now scientifically recognised. It is widely available in different forms in britain as over-the-counter supplements, particularly to treat the blood conditions and as an antiviral medicine. active compounds various sulphur-containing compounds occur in garlic. One such compound is called alliin. Crushing or chopping garlic may also promote enzyme reactions and allow other compounds to form. Studies show that these compounds may be responsible for various effects including pain relief, antiworm, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant, anticancer, blood glucose lowering, blood pressure lowering and liver protection. other research shows that garlic may help lower cholesterol, prevent blood clots and spasms, act as an expectorant and alleviate swellings, sores and acne. safety garlic is generally a very safe plant. Occasional reports show that adverse effects have occurred in humans. These include a burning sensation in the mouth and intestine, sickness, and odour from the breath and the body. It may also cause a reaction in the skin of some people, possibly due to the sulphur-containing compounds. Because of this, garlic should not be placed directly on the skin. Garlic may interfere with some prescribed medicines. For example, those used for preventing blood clots could be enhanced by garlic. There may also be an increased risk of bleeding with the use of garlic in patients undergoing surgery. few experimental or clinical studies have been conducted to assess the use of garlic in pregnant or breastfeeding women. In traditional medicine it has been reputed to promote abortion and contractions of the uterus. Consumption of garlic by breastfeeding women may alter the taste and smell of breast milk and so alter the feeding behaviour of babies. garlic - food garlic has been used as a food for thousands of years. It was traditionally used to add flavour to food. It is sold fresh, as a dry powder and as an oil and. Garlic is very popular in south asian cuisine. flavouring garlic is one of the most frequently used plants in many parts of india, pakistan and bangladesh and there are many different ways of using garlic. It is used not only to flavour curries but can be used for drinks and savoury deserts. To add a mild flavour to food the fresh cloves are cooked whole. If a stronger flavour is required, garlic cloves are crushed or ground and added to the dish. Garlic should not be cooked for too long as it can become bitter. Often garlic heads with small cloves are stronger than larger ones. an oil is processed from garlic which is used commercially as a flavouring. It it can be added to flavour otherwise bland vegetable oils. there are many different varieties of garlic on the market. The diversity in size and flavour is apparent in south asian markets. Garlic is not popular among everyone. Certain sects in india, such as jains and hindu brahmins, are forbidden to eat onion-related plants like garlic. The reasons differ in each case. Jains consider use of garlic to be too damaging to the plant, while some hindus consider garlic too stimulating. garlic - other uses garlic is sometime grown as a pest repelling plant by gardeners. Some companies have taken its pest-repelling properties a step further by isolating active compounds and marketing them in a spray-on formula.

View Complete Details

Garlic

garlic is a strong aromatic crop that is being cultivated in india, since ancient times. It is renowned for its distinctive flavor as well as medicinal properties. The garlic seeds made available by us are extensively used for curing coughs and fevers. Green garlic leaves are also applied externally to prevent the graying of hairs as well as to cure skin ailments such as eczema and scabies. And, when it comes to the leading wholesale garlic suppliers in the market, our services are the best. Moreover, we are also one of the principal garlic oil manufacturers from india. garlic is a strongly aromatic bulb crop that has been cultivated for thousands of years. Today it is renowned throughout the world for its distinctive flavour as well as health giving properties. South asia is no exception in using garlic in both cooking and medicine. the plant garlic is an upright plant that grows up to about 60 cm tall. The long, sword-shaped leaves grow from the bulb beneath the surface of the soil. Bulbs - rounded, composed of several smaller bulbs called cloves. Cloves and bulbs are covered by a white papery coat and are used in both cookery and medicine. only known as a domesticated crop in cultivation, garlic is thought to have originated in central asia. Garlic - history originating from central asia, the garlic we know today is a domesticated crop. The plant has spread since ancient times to other parts of the world as a food, flavouring and medicine. It is mentioned in ancient egyptian, greek, indian and chinese writings. garlic remedies the bulbs are the most frequently used parts of the plant. In india they are prepared in several ways including extracting the juice or pulping the bulb to a paste. This has been taken to relieve problems such as coughs and fevers, or applied externally to prevent the greying of hairs and to improve skin conditions such as eczema and scabies. It has even been applied to the noses of hysterical girls to calm them down! warmed garlic juice, or a mixture made with oil and the boiled bulb has been dropped into the ear to relieve earache and deafness. In ayurvedic and siddha medicine garlic juice has been used to alleviate sinus problems. In unani medicine, an extract is prepared from the dried bulb which is inhaled to promote abortion or taken to regulate menstruation. Unani physicians also use garlic to treat paralysis, forgetfulness, tremor, colic pains, internal ulcers and fevers. folk medicine extracts of the bulbs have been widely used in folk medicine. Whooping cough in children has been treated by administering a drink made with a hot water extract of the dried bulb mixed with honey, or by wearing a necklace of bulbs. Hot water extracts are also taken to kill intestinal worms. In pakistan an extract is traditionally taken orally to settle the stomach, treat coughs reduce fever. garlic bulbs have sometimes been combined with other plants to make medicines. Mixed with the leaves of the ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) it is used as a treatment for rabies. An infusion of the entire plant has been combined with sugar and taken to treat fevers. Garlic has also been used in traditional indian veterinary medicine to treat tetanus and inflammatory disorders of the lungs. garlic around the world garlic also features in traditional medicine in other parts of the world. In nepal, east asia and the middle east it has been used to treat all manner of illnesses including fevers, diabetes, rheumatism, intestinal worms, colic, flatulence, dysentery, liver disorders, tuberculosis, facial paralysis, high blood pressure and bronchitis. Garlic - western medicine the medicinal properties of garlic are now scientifically recognised. It is widely available in different forms in britain as over-the-counter supplements, particularly to treat the blood conditions and as an antiviral medicine. active compounds various sulphur-containing compounds occur in garlic. One such compound is called alliin. Crushing or chopping garlic may also promote enzyme reactions and allow other compounds to form. Studies show that these compounds may be responsible for various effects including pain relief, antiworm, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant, anticancer, blood glucose lowering, blood pressure lowering and liver protection. other research shows that garlic may help lower cholesterol, prevent blood clots and spasms, act as an expectorant and alleviate swellings, sores and acne. safety garlic is generally a very safe plant. Occasional reports show that adverse effects have occurred in humans. These include a burning sensation in the mouth and intestine, sickness, and odour from the breath and the body. It may also cause a reaction in the skin of some people, possibly due to the sulphur-containing compounds. Because of this, garlic should not be placed directly on the skin. Garlic may interfere with some prescribed medicines. For example, those used for preventing blood clots could be enhanced by garlic. There may also be an increased risk of bleeding with the use of garlic in patients undergoing surgery. few experimental or clinical studies have been conducted to assess the use of garlic in pregnant or breastfeeding women. In traditional medicine it has been reputed to promote abortion and contractions of the uterus. Consumption of garlic by breastfeeding women may alter the taste and smell of breast milk and so alter the feeding behaviour of babies. garlic - food garlic has been used as a food for thousands of years. It was traditionally used to add flavour to food. It is sold fresh, as a dry powder and as an oil and. Garlic is very popular in south asian cuisine. flavouring garlic is one of the most frequently used plants in many parts of india, pakistan and bangladesh and there are many different ways of using garlic. It is used not only to flavour curries but can be used for drinks and savoury deserts. To add a mild flavour to food the fresh cloves are cooked whole. If a stronger flavour is required, garlic cloves are crushed or ground and added to the dish. Garlic should not be cooked for too long as it can become bitter. Often garlic heads with small cloves are stronger than larger ones. an oil is processed from garlic which is used commercially as a flavouring. It it can be added to flavour otherwise bland vegetable oils. there are many different varieties of garlic on the market. The diversity in size and flavour is apparent in south asian markets. Garlic is not popular among everyone. Certain sects in india, such as jains and hindu brahmins, are forbidden to eat onion-related plants like garlic. The reasons differ in each case. Jains consider use of garlic to be too damaging to the plant, while some hindus consider garlic too stimulating. garlic - other uses garlic is sometime grown as a pest repelling plant by gardeners. Some companies have taken its pest-repelling properties a step further by isolating active compounds and marketing them in a spray-on formula.

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